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Is rock only an anglo-saxon affair?

posted on #1
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I'm convinced that every musical genre is the son of a certain culture and that the musicality of a language is also important. And I have always considered the Italian rock as "cheap". But in my opinion these guys have something to say, and I'm proud that they have won the Eurovision song contest. What do you think about it? Is rock only an anglo-saxon affair? :)
[youtube]RVH5dn1cxAQ[/youtube]
Edited by Carlomac on June 04 2021 18:57
posted on #2
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I listen to many sorts of rock since the age of 12, and honestly I don't like the song. I don't know the band, maybe they have better tunes to offer.

To me Italians were pretty good at progressive rock in the 70s, and GOBLIN is one of my favourite of the genre. Here are two great tunes by them :

[youtube]VZituFZR1Zw[/youtube]

[youtube]HAlpYgtQCLo[/youtube]

To me rock is mainly anglo-saxon but in America, many Italian-american are well known 'rockers'! Is it me or many guitar virtuosos or 'shredders' have italian roots? Such as Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Al di Meola, John Petrucci, Al Pitrelli, Michael Angelo Batio etc...

You can add Tony Iommi, who pretty much 'invented' heavy riffing and Ronnie James Dio, one of the best hard/heavy singer of all time. In a sense, heavy music is italian too :D
posted on #3
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Well s. America (esp. Brazil) has been produced some pretty amazing harder rock and metal... That's for sure. But, Thinking about it - culturally/historically the music from that area has always had a percussion drive so moving toward that makes sense I suppose- regardless - they have have some pretty rad bands and though I'd not call it progressive rock by genre, they are/were certainly progressive in their own right.
posted on #4
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Al-Fadista wrote:
I listen to many sorts of rock since the age of 12, and honestly I don't like the song. I don't know the band, maybe they have better tunes to offer.

To me Italians were pretty good at progressive rock in the 70s, and GOBLIN is one of my favourite of the genre. Here are two great tunes by them :

[youtube]VZituFZR1Zw[/youtube]

[youtube]HAlpYgtQCLo[/youtube]

To me rock is mainly anglo-saxon but in America, many Italian-american are well known 'rockers'! Is it me or many guitar virtuosos or 'shredders' have italian roots? Such as Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Al di Meola, John Petrucci, Al Pitrelli, Michael Angelo Batio etc...

You can add Tony Iommi, who pretty much 'invented' heavy riffing and Ronnie James Dio, one of the best hard/heavy singer of all time. In a sense, heavy music is italian too :D


By coincidence I've just uploaded a Goblin's tribute on wikiloops :)

Yes, I really like them but less when they sing in italian. In any case, in the 70' there were some good italian bands (Pfm, Area and so on). Today I also like Lacuna Coil (but they sing in english)[youtube]4wfRHPsRGkk[/youtube]

I agree about italian-american artists (I would add Frank Zappa and Steve Tyler, who's real name is Steven Victor Tallarico) but in that case the fusion beetwin the two cultures is decisive :)
Edited by Carlomac on May 29 2021 18:40
posted on #5
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Safe2breat wrote:
Well s. America (esp. Brazil) has been produced some pretty amazing harder rock and metal... That's for sure. But, Thinking about it - culturally/historically the music from that area has always had a percussion drive so moving toward that makes sense I suppose- regardless - they have have some pretty rad bands and though I'd not call it progressive rock by genre, they are/were certainly progressive in their own right.


Yes, I friend of mine is from Belo Horizonte and He always talks about Sepultura :)
But they sing in english and it makes a difference in my opinion :)
posted on #6
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Carlomac wrote:


By coincidence I've just uploaded a Goblin's tribute on wikiloops :)

Yes, I really like them but less when they sing in italian. In any case, in the 70' there were some good italian bands (Pfm, Area and so on). Today I also like Lacuna Coil (but they sing in english)[youtube]4wfRHPsRGkk[/youtube]

I agree about italian-american artists (I would add Frank Zappa and Steve Tyler, who's real name is Steven Victor Tallarico) but in that case the fusion beetwin the two cultures is decisive :)


I'll listen to your tribute, I'm intrigued!
Lacuna Coil, not for me. Not bad but it's really not grabbing me.
Didn't know about Steven Tyler. I know Joe Perry, Aerosmith guitarist, has italian & portuguese roots.
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There are some hard rocking Germans out there....
posted on #8
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TeeGee wrote:
There are some hard rocking Germans out there....


I think, Hard Rock is pandemic:[youtube]i4FqGPRQWFM[/youtube]
Edited by will_C on June 01 2021 14:19
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posted on #9
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will_C wrote:
TeeGee wrote:
There are some hard rocking Germans out there....


I think, Hard Rock is pandemic:[youtube]i4FqGPRQWFM[/youtube]


Thanks for your contribution will, this is a good example of what I mean: rock could be a universal language but you have to find the right "key", that fit with your culture. Without just imitating the anglo-saxon model :)
posted on #10
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TeeGee wrote:
There are some hard rocking Germans out there....


Scorpions are a good example (even if they sing in english) :)
They are not exactly "rock", but also Kraftwerk are to mention, I think.
To me the most important thing is to find the right way to adapt a musical genre to your own culture and language. I've composed some rock song in italian and I've realised that is much more difficult than in english :)
posted on #11
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I guess on the German side you will have to mention Ramstein. Not my preferred music but they can't be ignored. I have to add that when it comes to "Krautrock" ;) as a Kid I heard a lot of these bands, some of which are internationally known

Scorpions, Amon Düül 2 , Birth Control, Can, Kaftwerk, Tangerine Dream


[youtube]ZkW-K5RQdzo[/youtube]
posted on #12
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TeeGee wrote:
I guess on the German side you will have to mention Ramstein. Not my preferred music but they can't be ignored. I have to add that when it comes to "Krautrock" ;) as a Kid I heard a lot of these bands, some of which are internationally known

Scorpions, Amon Düül 2 , Birth Control, Can, Kaftwerk, Tangerine Dream


[youtube]ZkW-K5RQdzo[/youtube]


Yes, you're right I forgot to mention Ramstein. Honestly didn't know that Tangerine Dream were from Germany
posted on #13
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Carlomac wrote:
Al-Fadista wrote:
I listen to many sorts of rock since the age of 12, and honestly I don't like the song. I don't know the band, maybe they have better tunes to offer.

To me Italians were pretty good at progressive rock in the 70s, and GOBLIN is one of my favourite of the genre. Here are two great tunes by them :

[youtube]VZituFZR1Zw[/youtube]

[youtube]HAlpYgtQCLo[/youtube]

To me rock is mainly anglo-saxon but in America, many Italian-american are well known 'rockers'! Is it me or many guitar virtuosos or 'shredders' have italian roots? Such as Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Al di Meola, John Petrucci, Al Pitrelli, Michael Angelo Batio etc...

You can add Tony Iommi, who pretty much 'invented' heavy riffing and Ronnie James Dio, one of the best hard/heavy singer of all time. In a sense, heavy music is italian too :D


By coincidence I've just uploaded a Goblin's tribute on wikiloops :)

Yes, I really like them but less when they sing in italian. In any case, in the 70' there were some good italian bands (Pfm, Area and so on). Today I also like Lacuna Coil (but they sing in english)[youtube]4wfRHPsRGkk[/youtube]

I agree about italian-american artists (I would add Frank Zappa and Steve Tyler, who's real name is Steven Victor Tallarico) but in that case the fusion beetwin the two cultures is decisive :)


Ps: I forgot to mention the great Tom Morello
posted on #14
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[quote]TeeGee wrote:
I guess on the German side you will have to mention Ramstein. Not my preferred music but they can't be ignored. I have to add that when it comes to "Krautrock" ;) as a Kid I heard a lot of these bands, some of which are internationally known

Scorpions, Amon Düül 2 , Birth Control, Can, Kaftwerk, Tangerine Dream

Frankly speaking: Where Ramstein would be without "Einstürzende Neubauten"?
Just an example:
[youtube]KrfOahWNT_A[/youtube]
Edited by will_C on June 02 2021 14:13
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posted on #15
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Pretty sure the Angles and Saxons are Germanic people and what about all the great Celtic rock bands none of whom would describe themselves as Anglo Saxon! Just off the top of my head:

Manic St Preachers Stereophonics the Alarm , super Furry Animals, U2, Thin Lizzy, The Cranberries Boomtown rats The Undertones,Snow patrol,Biffy Clyro, Mogwai, Nazareth, Primal Scream, simple minds, Franz ferdinand etc etc etc
Please dont tell any of them they are Anglo Saxons!
Zoot
posted on #16
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Zoot wrote:
Pretty sure the Angles and Saxons are Germanic people and what about all the great Celtic rock bands none of whom would describe themselves as Anglo Saxon! Just off the top of my head:

Manic St Preachers Stereophonics the Alarm , super Furry Animals, U2, Thin Lizzy, The Cranberries Boomtown rats The Undertones,Snow patrol,Biffy Clyro, Mogwai, Nazareth, Primal Scream, simple minds, Franz ferdinand etc etc etc
Please dont tell any of them they are Anglo Saxons!


Sorry Zoot, but in my opinion they are. Even if they have got their own culture (and you can surely feel it in many of the bands you quoted), Ireland (and of course all UK) is officially an anglo saxon Country and I think that also in music there are many common traits (starting from english language, that is not secondary at all). But let's see what our irish friends on the Loops say... :)

Ps: I would add Gary Moore (also as a soloist, not only in Thin Lizzy exeperience), one of my favourite guitarists :)
Edited by Carlomac on June 04 2021 13:28
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