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here's a pentatonic scale tip

posted on #1
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Just a share for those learning. Not technical because I dont know theory, circle of fifths, etc.

A neat pentatonic tip that works with this track 62259
[url=http://www.wikiloops.com/backingtrack-jam-62259.php] TEXT Dm - G Progression With Drums[/url]

When the chord changes to G major your riff can start outside of the standard pentatonic scale. You can start your riff on the B note. So in the pentatonic scale first position try the d string 9th fret as your first note. Second position try the B string 12th fret and go what is referred to as the "BB box"
posted on #2
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Joined: 31.08.15
I'm a bit rusty on my theory, but doesn't that work with any scale as long as the note is within the scale?
"If that's a groove, the Grand Canyon's a ditch." - Geoffrey to Uncle Phil on the "Fresh Prince of Bell Aire.
posted on #3
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Posts: 335
Joined: 25.03.12
Generally speaking this is what happens:
dm (parallell to F major, 1 b ) has the tonic dm and the subdominant (5steps up or 7 steps down) gm where Bb is the minor 3rd (3 steps from root). It is very easy to add some spice by changing the third of the minor subdominant to major (4steps from root). That is from Bb to B in the case of dm.
Listen to [url=http://www.wikiloops.com/backingtrack-jam-58629.php] Cody trips Southern bread Bread and raised [/url] for additional examples and some more nice tricks
Pure fingerstyle
posted on #4
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Posts: 56
Joined: 11.03.15
Hey all,
Enjoying the info, always.

If I may ask a question,
What are the differences in Major Pentatonic, and Minor Pentatonic scales, when played over the same passage, so as the passage allows ?
Example, D,C,G ,,,, think marshall tucker can't you see for a second..
I have played both over it, started with Dminor pentatonic scale from the 10th fret low E string root, then moved to the Bmajor position at 7th fret low E string root, and played a minor pentatonic pattern.
This makes the Minor Pentatonic scale sound MAJOR.. !!? ?? !?! ???

That is my real question, WHY ?

It sounds great, try it, then tell me why this works so well.

~MasterK
posted on #5
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Posts: 335
Joined: 25.03.12
d Minor has one b in its staff. B is aleays flattened to Bb. This means that we have this collection of tones:
D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C
Any one of these notes can be picked as a tonal center to produce a mode or scale:
D gives Aeolian or natural minor
E gives locrian
F gives ionian or major
G gives dorian
A gives phrygian
Bb gives lydian
C gives mixolydian
So all these modes contain the same notes but with a different tonal center. This pattern repeats itself for all 12 keys in the circle of fifths.

Of these modes, the following have a major third and a perfect fifth enableing them to form major triads:
F, ionian -> A, C
Bb, lydian -> D, F
C, mixolydian -> E, G

These modes form minor triads:
d, aeolian -> f, a
g, dorian -> Bb, d
a, phrygian -> c, e

A minor pentatonic consists of a minor third, perfect fourth and fifth and minor seventh in addition to the root. This means that a minor pentatonic fits all minor modes. It also means that if you superimpose those three minor pentatonics you will get all notes in the full scale.

A major pentatonic has a major second, third and sixth and a perfect fourth anf fifth. Or an other way to look at it, if you take a minor pentatonic and make the third the tonal center you will get a major pentatonic. For example d minor pentatonic and F major pentatonic contain the same notes with different tonal centers (this is why they sound different in spite of having the same notes). And in analog to minor pentatonic a major pentatonic scale fits all major modes. And if you superimpose the three major pentatonics you get all notes of the full scale.

So if you are playing a B minor pentatonic over a tonal center of D you are actually playing a D major pentatonic. The notes are the same but the tonal center is different.

When chaninging between d minor pentatonic and b minor pentatonic you are creating a minor/major modulation. This is a way of breaking out of the scale context and introducing out of scale notes that spice up your playing. But this introduces a new challenge managing the dissonances that can occur.


A
Edited by nilton on 26-03-2016 19:09
Pure fingerstyle
posted on #6
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Posts: 56
Joined: 11.03.15
Awesome explanation Nilton.
I see some of what your talking about, I will re-read until fully getting it.

The tonal center is what matters most, is what I am gathering from what you said.

This helps. I have wondered about that for some time.

Thanks,

~MasterK
posted on #7
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Posts: 335
Joined: 25.03.12
MasterK wrote:
Awesome explanation Nilton.
I see some of what your talking about, I will re-read until fully getting it.

The tonal center is what matters most, is what I am gathering from what you said.

This helps. I have wondered about that for some time.

Thanks,

~MasterK


You are welcome, but please dont limit yourself to just reading. Practice and application is what makes us really learn things.

two more tips: Check out the country hybrid scale
And check out Scott Hendersons handling of pentatonics
Pure fingerstyle
posted on #8
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Posts: 22
Joined: 13.11.15
Thanks for that comprehensive explanation Nilton. MasterK, I had a listen to the Marshall Tucker song and was happy playing D minor and A minor pentatonics, but not sure about some of the B minor pentatonic notes and found myself bending those to fit. I wasn't feeling a major vibe but it was 'different' :)
posted on #9
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Posts: 56
Joined: 11.03.15
LoBias wrote:
Thanks for that comprehensive explanation Nilton. MasterK, I had a listen to the Marshall Tucker song and was happy playing D minor and A minor pentatonics, but not sure about some of the B minor pentatonic notes and found myself bending those to fit. I wasn't feeling a major vibe but it was 'different' :)


@ Nilton,
Yes, I do know what you mean about practice and utilizing them..
Will deffinately check Scott's idea's out.
Thanks again brother.

@ LoBias,
That is how I did them also, It wasn't a true pentatonic, but I had no other term to use..
Sometimes the brain shortcuts when communicating with others.. lol..
But, seriously. It is a neat sound don't you think,
even if there is no true term , or way to describe.
Most of it fits, and to go back and forth in the same solo, seemed to work best for me.
I would start in Dm pent. then end up at the B part to finish the run.

Anyhow, glad you guys thought about it, and helped me.

~MasterK
posted on #10
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Posts: 22
Joined: 13.11.15
Well my brain definitely short-circuits when it comes to music theory :) It's difficult to describe but I associate certain notes with a sensation such as taste - I don't think in terms of scales or arpeggios fitting over a particular chord. I have to rely on a memory of a certain harmony but this is where I get caught out. If I practice enough, I can sometimes retain enough 'memory' to know where a note will be to fit the progression. I wish I had started playing young, and had paid attention in music class !

Just going back to taste, on some of the B position notes I was getting a flavour of roast beef after ice cream... like just enough to say 'don't go there again' :)
Edited by LoBias on 30-03-2016 01:41
posted on #11
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Posts: 335
Joined: 25.03.12
Our brain reacts to music in ways that are not well known. Whilst other activities tend to be centralised to some specific regions music tends be much more dispersed. That is what makes music that exiting. And that is why music theory can take you only so far.

If you play B pentatonic minor over a d minor progression that can produce a number of dissonant sounds, you have to be careful to use them right
Pure fingerstyle
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